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Thursday, June 26, 2008

The Mass

The following excerpts from the Augsburg Confession and the Apology of the Augsburg Confession are provided regarding usage of the word "Mass" and the return to the frequent offering of the Sacrament among Lutherans:

Confessio Augustana, Art. XXIV, De Missa

Falso accusantur ecclesiae nostrae, quod missam aboleant. Retinetur enim missa apud nos et summa reverentia celebratur.
(Triglotta, p.64)

Falsely are our churches accused of abolishing the Mass; for the Mass is retained among us, and celebrated with the highest reverence.
(Triglotta, p. 65)

Our churches are falsely accused of abolishing the Mass. Actually, the Mass is retained among us and is celebrated with the greatest reverence.
(Tappert, Latin, p. 56)

Our churches are falsely accused of abolishing the Mass. In fact, the Mass is retained among us and is celebrated with the greatest reverence."
(Kolb / Wengert, Latin, p. 69)

Our churches are falsely accused of abolishing the Mass. The Mass is held among us and celebrated with the highest reverence.
(McCain, et al, p. 73)

Apologia Confessionis, Art. XXIV, De Missa

Initio hoc iterum praefendum est nos non abolere missam, sed religiose retinere ac defendere. Fiunt enim apud nos missae singulis dominicis e aliis festis, in quibus porrigitur sacramentum his, qui uti volunt, postquam sunt explorati atque absoluti. Et servantur usitatae ceremoniae publicae, ordo lectionum, orationum, vestitus et alia
similia.
(Triglotta, pp. 382, 384)

At the outset we must again make the preliminary statement that we do not abolish the Mass, but religiously maintain and defend it. For among us masses are celebrated every Lord's Day and on the other festivals, in which the Sacrament is offered to those who wish to use it, after they have been examined and absolved. And the usual public ceremonies are observed, the series of lessons, of prayers, vestments, and other like things.
(Triglotta, pp. 383, 385)

To begin with, we must repeat the prefatory statement that we do not abolish the Mass but religiously keep and defend it. In our churches Mass is celebrated every Sunday and on other festivals, when the sacrament is offered to those who wish for it after they have been examined and absolved. We keep traditional liturgical forms, such as the order of the lessons, prayers, vestments, etc.
(Tappert, p. 249)

At the outset it is again necessary, by way of preface, to point out that we do not abolish the Mass but religiously retain and defend it. Among us the Mass is celebrated every Lord's day and on other festivals, when the sacrament is made available to those who wish to partake of it, after they have been examined and absolved. We also keep traditional liturgical forms, such as the order of readings, prayers, vestments, and other similar things.
(Kolb / Wengert, p. 258)

At the outset, we must again make this preliminary statement: we do not abolish the Mass, but religiously keep and defend it. Masses are celebrated among us every Lord's Day and on the other festivals. The Sacrament is offered to those who wish to use it, after they have been examined and absolved. And the usual public ceremonies are observed, the series of lessons, of prayers, vestments, and other such things.
(McCain, et al, p. 246)

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