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quod pro nobis traditum est

Friday, July 28, 2006

in the liturgy of the Church

"When you are baptized, partake of Holy Communion, receive the absolution, or listen to a sermon, heaven is open, and we hear the voice of the Heavenly Father; all these works descend upon us from the open heaven above us. God converses with us, provides for us; and Christ hovers over us--but invisibly. And even though there were clouds above us as impervious as iron or steel, obstructing our view of heaven, this would not matter. Still we hear God speaking to us from heaven; we call and cry to Him, and He answers us. Heaven is open, as St. Stephen saw it open (Acts 7:55); and we hear God when He addresses us in Baptism, in Holy Communion, in confession, and in His Word as it proceeds from the mouth of the men who proclaim His message to the people."

- Martin Luther (From 2 Sermons on the Saturday after St. Anthony's Day, 1538; Luther's Works, Vol. 22 : Sermons on the Gospel of St. John: Chapters 1-4. p.201 )

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Great quote, but you are very naughty. You have not indicated the name of the document from which it is from, nor any source. Thanks.

Rev. Timothy May, M.Div., S.S.P. said...

I am glad you caught that. This is a quote I picked up off an e-mail, website or blog years ago as one worth keeping. Hopefully, any readers, or Luther scholars among us, can help with your question (and help me out in the process). Thanks for the question!

Christopher Gillespie said...

According to Libronix:

This is the end of the fifteenth and the beginning of the sixteenth sermon, dated “the Saturday after St. Anthony’s day,” January 19, 1538.

Luther, Martin. Vol. 22, Luther's Works, Vol. 22 : Sermons on the Gospel of St. John: Chapters 1-4. p.201

Edited by Jaroslav Jan Pelikan, Hilton C. Oswald and Helmut T. Lehmann. Luther's Works. Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1999, c1957.

Rev. Timothy May, M.Div., S.S.P. said...

Thanks Christopher! This is a great quote and it is good to know that there is indeed a source for it.